Dunkleosteus A A

The Dunkleosteus was the dominant carnivorous predator during the Devonian Period. It was a member of
the Placoderm family which was characterized by their bony plates on the outside of their heads. The Dunkleosteus became extinct at the end of the Devonian in a mass extinction. It left no descendants and lasted only 50 million years.

Posted March 26, 2015
Categories: Current Exhibits, Exhibits
Tags: Carnivorous, Devonian, Dominant, Dunkleosteus, Extinct, Placoderm

Did you like this post? You might be interested in...

Triassic Period...

The first dinosaur is believed to be Coelophysis. ...

More On Current Exhibits »

Cretaceous Peri...

The Cretaceous period had a relatively warm climat ...

More On Current Exhibits »

Also at the museum:

New Health and Safety Protocols for the Naranjo Museum

With your help, we can create a safe environment for visitors and museum staff. We are excited to welcome visitors to the museum again, but please know that visiting the Naranjo Museum is optional and ...

More On Blog »

Nov. 21st: Exhibit Opening Event with Artifact Identification

EXHIBIT OPENING EVENT: Saturday, November 21st, 1pm-5pm PURCHASE TICKETS HERE Join us as we celebrate Texas history and the new Texas Artifacts Exhibit. Visitors will enjoy viewing the new exhib ...

More On Blog »

Dancing with Dinos Further Postponed

(Press Release:) The Naranjo Museum’s annual spring gala “Dancing with Dinos” which was previously rescheduled for September 12th, will be further postponed until conditions surrounding COVID-19 impr ...

More On Blog »

Museum Grand Opening Reception

Colossal Cocktail Reception & Celebration at The Naranjo Museum of Natural History Enjoy the museum up close with fabulous food, beer and wine (adults will be responsible for their children). Doo ...

More On Blog »

Search the Museum


Naranjo Museum of Natural History

We are open

Tickets Price
Age 3 & under Free
Age 4 to 18 $5.00
Adults $7.50

Hours of Operation
Mon. - Sat.: 10 AM to 6 PM
Sunday: 1 PM to 6 PM

For more information, call
(936) 639-3466